Split

SPLIT

Split is the second-largest city of Croatia and the largest city of the region of Dalmatia, with about 300,000 people living in its urban area. It lies on the eastern shore of the Adriatic Sea and is spread over a central peninsula and its surroundings. An intraregional transport hub and popular tourist destination, the city is linked to the Adriatic islands and the Apennine peninsula. Split has a borderline humid subtropical and Mediterranean climate. It has hot, moderately dry summers and mild, wet winters, which can occasionally feel cold, because of the strong northern wind bura. Split has its own Pride!

1. The inhabitants of Split (Splićani) may appear to be a homogeneous body, they traditionally belong to three groups. The old urban families, the Fetivi, (short for “Fetivi Splićani”, “real Split natives”) are generally very proud of their city, its history and its distinctive traditional speech (a variant of the Chakavian dialect). The Fetivi, now a distinct minority, are sometimes referred to (semi-derogatorily) as “Mandrili” – and are augmented by the so-called Boduli, immigrants from the nearby Adriatic islands who mostly arrived over the course of the 20th century.

2. In 1979, the historic center of Split was included into the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites. Split is said to be one of the centres of Croatian culture. Its literary tradition can be traced to medieval times, and includes names like Marko Marulić, while in more modern times Split excelled by authors famous for their sense of humor. Among them the most notable is Miljenko Smoje, famous for his TV series „Malo misto“ and „Velo misto“, with the latter dealing with the development of Split into a modern city.

3. Also well known is Ivo Tijardović, and his famous operetta “Little Floramye” (Mala Floramye). Both Smoje and Tijardović are famous artists thought to represent the old Split traditions that are slowly dying out due to the city being overwhelmed by large numbers of rural migrants from the undeveloped hinterland.

4. Diocletian’s Palace (UNESCO heritage site) – The historic centre of Split is built around the remains of this Roman palace. You only need to wander around to experience it but you can also pay to visit the excavated remains of the basement of the palace. The palace has well preserved main streets cardo and decumanus. Roman palace is enriched with some gothic and reinassance buildings which makes a perfect match. Palace has 4 monumental gates Porta Aurea(Zlatna vrata, Golden gate), Porta Argenta (Srebrna vrata, Silver gate), Porta Ferrea (Željezna vrata, Iron gate) and Porta Aenea (Mjedena vrata. Bronze gate). It is probably the best preserved Roman palace in general.

5. Ivan Meštrović Gallery (Croatian: Galerija Meštrović), is an art museum in Split, Croatia dedicated to the work of the 20th-century sculptor, Ivan Meštrović. The gallery preserves and presents to the public the most significant works of Meštrović, and is in itself an art monument. The permanent collection includes works of sculpture, drawings, design, furniture and architecture. Holdings include original plaster models by the artist, as well as finished works in bronze, marble and wood. The gallery building and grounds were based on original plans by Meštrović himself, and included living and working areas, as well as exhibition spaces. The gallery’s holdings today contain 192 sculptures, 583 drawings, 4 paintings, 291 architectural plans (almost entirely made by Ivan Meštrović and dating between 1898 and 1961), and 2 furniture sets, one of which is made according to Meštrović’s sketches and is a part of the new permanent display in the former dining room.

6. Split’s most famous tennis player is retired 2001 Wimbledon champion Goran Ivanišević.

7. Baseball in Split is one of the city’s longest traditions. Although the sport began semi-officially in December 1918 when a group of US sailors from a ship in port introduced the game to some young Croats, it wasn’t until 1972 when a pair of teachers at a local school formed the Salona Baseball Club, named after the ancient Roman city of Salona

8. Picigin is a traditional local sport (originating in 1908), played on the famous sandy beach Bačvice. It is played in very shallow water (just ankle deep) with a small ball. Picigin is played by five players. The ball is the peeled tennis ball. There is a tradition of playing picigin in Split on New Year’s Day, regardless of the weather conditions, in spite of the sea temperature rarely exceeding 10 °C (50°F)

9. Riva is the main city promenade and Marmont street, as well.

10. Marjan – a hill situated on the west of Split. Marjan is an oasis for many people who look for a natural stress relief, a great place for long walks, jogging, and bike rides. Marjan’s peak, Telegrin is 174 m high and gives a wonderful panoramic view of Split. South cliffs are popular within alpine climbers. St. Nicholas church is situated on the east of Marjan, on it’s south side are beautiful St. Jeronimus church and “Gospe od Betlema” church (Madonna of Betlehem). House building is strictly forbidden in order to save Marjan – the lungs of Split.

11. Poljud stadium. Poljud stadium known to locals as “Poljudska Ljepotica” (Poljud Beauty”) is a second largest stadium in Croatia and has a capacity of 36,000 people. The stadium was originally constructed by the Yugoslavian government as part of the facilites for the 1979 Mediterannean Games and was officially opened by Josip Broz Tito, who was avowed fan of the team who play their home games in Poljud HNK Hajduk Split. By far the most important and revered sports team in Dalmatia, a dedicatet fanbase around the world has followed Hajduk throughout the team’s history. There are numerous anecdotes about Hajduk never played without at least some of their loyal fans in the stands, the Torcida. It is the oldest supporters group in Europe. If you are going to visit some match do not go on north part, which is the cheapest one, that part is reserved for Torcida.

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